ISRO successfully launched its INSAT-3DR advanced weather satellite in copy-book style on Thursday evening using its heavy geosynchronous satellite launch vehicle GSLV-F05 rocket #Hindustan360

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The launch was delayed by 40 minutes as the fuelling of the third stage of the rocket took longer than expected. Around 17 minutes after lift-off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre at 4.50 pm, the GSLV rocket slung the 2,211 kg satellite into a geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO), from where it would be guided to its final geostationary orbit. The launch was delayed by 40 minutes as the fuelling of the third stage of the rocket took longer than expected. View more at #Hindustan360 .


With the launch of INSAT-3DR, the Indian space agency has successfully launched three satellites weighing over two tonnes of the six satellites weighing over two tonnes it had flown in a GSLV rocket.

Indian space scientists have spent around two decades and around Rs 500 crore ($75 million)in conceiving and developing the cryogenic technology.

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) scientists at the mission control centre were visibly happy. They slapped each other on the back and hugged each other once the rocket ejected the satellite, which can also aid in search and rescue (SAR) missions, into its intended orbit.

Today we reached one more landmark, successfully putting the weather monitoring satellite into orbit,” ISRO’s Chairman A.S. Kiran Kumar said.

The satellite’s life expectancy is 10 years. The GSLV is a three stage rocket. The first stage is fired by solid fuel and its four strap-on motors by liquid fuel. The second powered by liquid fuel and the third is the ISRO-developed cryogenic engine that is more efficient as it provides more thrust for every kilogram of propellant burnt. ISRO can now launch satellites weighing around 2-2.5 tonnes till such time it readies an advanced GSLV variant — GSLV-Mark III — that can lug satellites weighing around four tonnes.

The year-end is expected to see the launch from here of the GSLV-Mk-III with the GSAT-19 communication satellite weighing around 3.2 tonnes — the heaviest to be lifted by an Indian rocket.

View more at #Hindustan360 .